Is veganism philosophically sound?Why vegans can/cannot consider drinking milk for protein?

Hey health freak! (sorry not you, I am). So this is a stepwise debate I fought with myself on 'Why vegans can/cannot consider drinking milk for protein' using the internet. Even though some sources can't be claimed by me to be true, all the sources I used for my arguments seemed reliable to me. Better believe me than do the hardwork again :P

I think this argument started with this thought in my mind:



So can I really not say protein if I am a vegan is the question I tried to answer indirectly.

Firstly, for mostly Indian population (as I am an Indian), So can I really not say protein if I am a vegan is the question I tried to answer indirectly.

Firstly, for mostly Indian population (as I am an Indian), veganism is both the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of animals. (Wiki) This basically means that they don't consume even milk as milk feeders (MILF's) like cows are treated as a 'commodity' even when they are bred only for milk and not killed for meat.

Well the next question that I arose in my mind is : Well, don't vegans love dogs? Do vegans own pets?

Yes, they can own animals, provided that the animals are adopted or rescued. This excludes buying animals that are sold at pet stores or bred for certain aesthetic characteristics, or from (puppy) mills, etc.(source).This principle amazed me for the clarity veganism has in its philosophy. 

Seeing milk as source of protein- then I tried to prove vegans need milk to balance protein intake. I found this:

The RDA (whatever!) recommends that we take in 0.8 grams of protein for every kilogram that we weigh (or about 0.36 grams of protein per pound that we weigh) So for a 75kg person, By calculation, 120 g of daily protein intake is recommended. (source) However, if one aspires to build muscles or keep muscles while losing fat oher sources say for people building muscles safe to say 1-1.5 gram of protein per pound of body weight” (source). Well, this is approximately 200g (I took 1.25g per pound) of protein intake per day for person weighing 75kg (which is my weight, ahem I need to decrease..)

1 gram of protein contains 4 calories meaning 800 calories (source). Within a healthy, balanced diet, a man needs around 2,500kcal a day to maintain his weight. (source) So if a vegan who works out needs 2500 Calories, of which nearly 800 calories are expected to be from protein. I hence agree that it is easy for a vegan diet to meet recommendations for protein, as long as calorie intake is adequate. (source)

A reasonable argument in favor of cow's milk is that whey protein found in cows' milk appears to be more effective than soy protein at promoting muscle gains, according to a study published in 2013 in Journal of the American College of Nutrition. (source) On the other hand, a reasonable argument in favor of soy milk is that although soy milk is not fat-free, it is extremely low-carb and provides a good amount of protein what makes it very filling. (source) So for me, both the arguments are subjective and approximately cancel each other. So let's move on!


However, comparing soy milk with non-fat milk, I found that below there is a benefit of 2.3g of protein intake by taking a cup (200ml) of skimmed milk over a cup of  soy milk. If we compare this 2.3g per cup of milk expecting to fill up expected 200g of  protein intake in a day, it seems I am overthinking here whether to replace milk with soymilk and hence seems insignificant. . 
Soy milk vs Skimmed milk : source

So can I really not say protein if I am a vegan is the question I tried to answer indirectly.

Firstly, for mostly Indian population (as I am an Indian), veganism is both the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of animals. (Wiki) This basically means that they don't consume even milk as milk feeders (MILF's) like cows are treated as a 'commodity' even when they are bred only for milk and not killed for meat.

Well the next question that I arose in my mind is : Well, don't vegans love dogs? Do vegans own pets?

Yes, they can own animals, provided that the animals are adopted or rescued. This excludes buying animals that are sold at pet stores or bred for certain aesthetic characteristics, or from (puppy) mills, etc.(source).This principle amazed me for the clarity veganism has in its philosophy. 

Seeing milk as source of protein- then I tried to prove vegans need milk to balance protein intake. I found this:

The RDA (whatever!) recommends that we take in 0.8 grams of protein for every kilogram that we weigh (or about 0.36 grams of protein per pound that we weigh) So for a 75kg person, By calculation, 120 g of daily protein intake is recommended. (source) However, if one aspires to build muscles or keep muscles while losing fat oher sources say for people building muscles safe to say 1-1.5 gram of protein per pound of body weight” (source). Well, this is approximately 200g (I took 1.25g per pound) of protein intake per day for person weighing 75kg (which is my weight, ahem I need to decrease..)

1 gram of protein contains 4 calories meaning 800 calories (source). Within a healthy, balanced diet, a man needs around 2,500kcal a day to maintain his weight. (source) So if a vegan who works out needs 2500 Calories, of which nearly 800 calories are expected to be from protein. I hence agree that it is easy for a vegan diet to meet recommendations for protein, as long as calorie intake is adequate. (source)

A reasonable argument in favor of cow's milk is that whey protein found in cows' milk appears to be more effective than soy protein at promoting muscle gains, according to a study published in 2013 in Journal of the American College of Nutrition. (source) On the other hand, a reasonable argument in favor of soy milk is that although soy milk is not fat-free, it is extremely low-carb and provides a good amount of protein what makes it very filling. (source) So for me, both the arguments are subjective and approximately cancel each other. So let's move on!


However, comparing soy milk with non-fat milk, I found that below there is a benefit of 2.3g of protein intake by taking a cup (200ml) of skimmed milk over a cup of  soy milk. If we compare this 2.3g per cup of milk expecting to fill up expected 200g of  protein intake in a day, it seems I am overthinking here whether to replace milk with soymilk and hence seems insignificant. 








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